What drives the position of sexually transmitted infections on global policy agendas?

Summary

Sexually transmitted infections (STI) are not only a neglected public health problem but also a societal one. One million new curable STIs occur every day in the world, mostly in low – and middle – income countries. STIs, such as syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhoea may have serious complications, especially for women’s reproductive health. Others, such as human papillomavirus, can cause cancer. Even though effective interventions to prevent and treat STI exist, neither governments nor other policy makers give them high priority or grant investments in their prevention.

This project is structured around three questions:

– What are the factors that influence the political prioritisation of STIs as a global health issue?

– What is the total global burden of disease caused by STI, based on statistical methods to combining data from different sources?

– What are community views about STI in pregnancy?

The methods employed in the project include policy analysis, estimations of the total global burden of disease as well as interviews with pregnant women and key informants in Papua New Guinea and Zambia. Gender will be one of the main research lenses while examining these questions.

This project’s findings will help public health officials make the changes needed to prioritise the prevention and control of STI worldwide.

Project Keywords

  • Gender
  • Pregnancy
  • Public policy
  • Reproductive health
  • Sexually transmitted infections

Disciplines

  • Anthropology
  • Biostatistics
  • Epidemiology
  • Gender studies
  • Media analysis
  • Policy analysis

Collaborations

International Organizations

  • World Health Organization

Relevant Countries

  • Papua New Guinea
  • Zambia
  • China

Status

This is an ongoing project, which started in autumn 2019. The information here is updated regularly. If you have any inquiries please don’t hesitate to contact the project team via the form below.

Project Description Video

Contact the project team

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Research team

Nicola Low
Coordinator
University of Bern

Eva Cignacco Müller
Co-Coordinator
Bern University of Applied Sciences

Dianne Egli-Gany
Principal Member
University of Bern

Research Assistant
Principal Member
University of Bern

Christine Bigler Luhm
Principal Member
University of Bern

Nathalie Broutet
Principal Member
World Health Organization

Sarah Hawkes
Principal Member
University College London

Angela Kelly-Hanku
Principal Member
Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research

Wu Dadong
Principal Member
Independent Consultant 

 

Nicolas Kassebaum
Associated Member
University of Washington

Theo Vos
Associated Member
University of Washington

Melanie Taylor
Associated Member
World Health Organization

Andrew Vallely
Associated Member
Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research

Matthew Chico
Associated Member
Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research

William Pomat
Associated Member
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Bolin Cao
Associated Member
Shenzhen University